Children’s Catechism Lesson 1: Who Made You?

Ever since I have been introduced to the Reformed faith, I’ve been wanting to write a catechism curriculum for children based on the First Catechism, an intro to the Westminster Shorter Catechism. That was almost a decade ago, and even though I was involved in children’s ministry I was not prepared to write a catechism curriculum. But having children of my own provided me with practical tools that could help me understand what it means to explain the beautiful truths of the Christian faith in a way that young children can understand. And getting to know more children with special learning needs has allowed me to discover various ways to explain these truths in a creative manner.

You can find a complete list of catechism question and answers at the Westminster Standard or through the OPC website.

Lesson 1

The first question and answer may seem too simple, even a small toddler can echo back the answer. But in the 21st century when evolution is a common thing, knowing the answer to the first question is essential to any young believer.

Q1: Who made you?
A: God.

Little Miss (now 5) only began echoing answers to this catechism question at age 3, and the Little Man (now 2) only parroted the answer when I taught him to answer “God” in a song-song manner. He started out answering “Amen” to the question when I reintroduced the catechism. Perhaps he associates God with prayer, which may actually be a good thing.

Lesson Plan

  • Topic: Who Made You?
  • Bible Passages: Genesis 1:26-30; Psalm 139:13-14
  • Big Idea: God created man out of nothing after His image.
  • Objectives: Children shall recognize that God was the One who created them. Children shall realize that God made them out of nothing and after His image. Children shall take comfort in knowing that they are wonderfully made by God.
  • Materials Used: Clay, Googly Eyes, Foam Stickers, Pipe Cleaners

Hook

Introduce the lesson by asking what the child’s name is, most toddlers are able to do that. An older child can write his name on a piece of paper. And then ask if he knows the story (i.e. meaning, history or reason for choosing) behind his name.
If your child is not yet ready for any of that, this is a great opportunity for you to practice saying or writing his name with him. Once or twice would be enough to start the lesson.

Transition to the next part by asking, “Do you know who made (Insert Child’s Name)? Let’s find out!”

Book

Read a story of how created Adam and Eve from a Gospel-centered story Bible or from the Bible directly. You could also use the first few pages of God Made All of Me by Justine and Lindsey Holcomb, which also addresses Q/A 1 and 2 of the catechism.

If older kids have questions regarding how God created us, you could look into Chapter 3 (“God Created Everything out of Nothing at All”) from The Oology by Marty Machowski (HT: Reformed Mama). You may also introduce the Latin phrase ex nihilo which means “out of nothing”. God did not use any raw materials to create man. Instead, He said it and it came be.

Look

After the Bible story, repeatedly practice the catechism question and answer.

  • Who made you? God.
  • Did God use anything to create man? No. God created man out of nothing.
  • How did God create man? God created man after His own image.

Took

Bring home the lesson by introducing another Bible passage in Psalm 139:13-14, “For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well.” (ESV)

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Teach your child that all men are wonderfully created by God. Each of us are unique in the way our brains are wired, even how each of us are gifted differently. As God’s creatures, He has also given us emotions that could express how we feel. We can be happy by praising God who wonderfully made us. We can be sad when some people try to hurt others who are likewise created by God. We can be angry when some people try to destroy God’s original design for the male and female. You may use clay and other craft materials (optional) to teach your child about his body parts or different emotions. Teaching the importance of identifying or verbalizing emotions is an essential life goal for children with special needs. Non-verbal or less verbal children can learn by identifying pictures to convey their feelings.

Another alternative is to simply ask him to draw and color himself, if able. Make sure to add the phrase “God Made (Insert Child’s Name)” when done. You could then wrap up the lesson by singing “God Made Me” by the Cedarmont Kids:

God made me, God made me
In my Bible book it says
That God made me

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