Children’s Catechism Lesson 5: One True God

Lesson Plan

  • Topic: One True God
  • Bible Passage: Isaiah 45:5; Exodus 20
  • Big Idea: There is only one true God.
  • Objectives: Children will acknowledge that the Bible teaches that there is only one true God. Children will understand that we do not worship more than one true God. Children will see that worshipping others persons/things other than God is the sin of idolatry. 
  • Materials Used: 

HOOK

We have learned many big and important things about God. And in our catechism lesson for this week, we will learn another important lesson the Bible says about God. Read the first part of Isaiah 45:5. The Bible teaches us that God said He is the only true God. There is no other God besides Him alone. Our catechism lesson this week is:

  1. Is there more than one true God?
    No. There is only one true God.

Some people we know make pretend gods out of stone, clay or even wood. They bow down and worship to these false gods, thinking these statues or images can help them. These statues or images are what we call idols. Can you try to think of some idols in our country? (Santo Niño, Black Nazarene, Mama Mary, QuanYi Ma, Buddha, etc.) People in the Old Testament also tried to make an idol. Some of them even worship the sun, moon, and stars. When God chose the Israelites and kept them safe from the many troubles in Egypt, God told them to bow down to Him alone because He is the only real true God.  

BOOK

God saved the people of Israel from the bad things that Pharoah and his army in Egypt. They saw the waters open, and how the Lord protected them from being taken again. They travelled far far away until they reached a big mountain called Mount Sinai. God gave the Israelites his special instructions on how to live as God’s family. Then Moses climbed up the mountain where God spoke to him for many days. God gave Moses these special instructions called the commandments, and God Himself wrote them on stone tablets.

God told them, “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery. ” Two of the ten commandments says that:

Thou shalt have no other gods but Me;
Before no idol bow thy knee.

But Moses stayed up in the mountain for quite a while, and the people were not sure if her would come back. And so the brother of Moses, Aaron, asked for all their gold things so he could melt them their necklaces, coins into a golden calf.

Then the people had a party to celebrate, saying that the calf was the god who saved them from Egypt! The Israelites disobeyed God’s instructions. They disobeyed God’s law because they didn’t love him the best. When Moses went down from the mountain, he saw all that the people had done.  He became so angry that he threw the stone tablets, and that it broke into pieces.

LOOK

  • Is there more than one true God? No. There is only one true God.
  • Who saved the Israelites from Pharoah and his army? God.
  • What were the first two commandments that God gave the Israelite people? Thou shalt have no other gods but Me; Before no idol bow thy knee.
  • Did the Israelite people follow God’s commandments? No. They made an idol out of gold.

TOOK

Ask your child about their favorites. Start with their favorite color, animal, food, and then toy. Then ask about who their favorite person is. 

God has given us many things to enjoy. He has blessed us with food, toys, and our family. These are wonderful gifts from God! An old French pastor called John Calvin once said that our hearts are like idol factoriesWe make idols out of God’s wonderful gifts when we love them more than we love God. We should always love God best. But we don’t always do that, don’t we? Do you know who did? God sent His Son Jesus to become like us. Jesus was tempted too, like us. But He obeyed all of God’s commandments, each and everyone of them. Jesus came to live the perfect life in our place, and take the punishment for our sins by dying on the cross so that we can be forgiven.

One of the ways God can help us follow his commands is to hide God’s Word in our hearts. This is why we’ll be learning and singing the Ten Commandments Song by Judy Rogers:

Thou shalt have no other gods but Me;
Before no idol bow thy knee.
Take not the Name of God in vain;
Nor dare the Sabbath Day profane.
Give both thy parents honor due;
Take heed that thou no murder do.
Abstain from words and deeds unclean;
Nor steal, though thou art poor and lean.
And do not lie, but always say what is true,
And covet not the things that don’t belong to you!

 

You could also play a memory game based on the Ten Commandments.

The printable memory game is available via Etsy. Another suggestion is to do a puzzle game to help with memory work. Here’s a free printable over at Life, Hope & Truth.

 

What is Classical Christian Education?

Teaching Truth, Goodness, and Beauty to the Glory of God

What is classical education?

Classical Education is language-focused, and it has a lot to do with content instead of images or visuals. It is a method of teaching children according to the medieval understanding of how children develop. Dorothy Sayers defines these three stages as Parrot, Pert, and Poet in her wonderful essay, The Lost Tools of Learning.

Grammar (Parrot)

The first stage calls for the storing of knowledge, often referred to as the Grammar Stage. Children find it easy to memorize facts and rules. It’s all about filling up the “sponges” with as much content as possible. Ages 4-10.

Logic (Pert)

The second stage calls for understanding, otherwise known as the Logic Stage. Children now begin to make sense of what they have learned. They will start to reason and analyze the information they have accumulated. Ages 10-14.

Rhetoric (Poet)

And the last stage calls for wisdom, what Classical educators call the Rhetoric stage. Most children at this age yearn for self-expression and independence. It is also at this stage where they acquire communication skills so that they apply and integrate the things they have learned. Ages 14-18.

Distinctly Christian WORLDVIEW

While modern education seeks to put the child in the center of all learning, Classical Christian Education sees that God is the center of all learning. It recognizes that all truth is God’s truth, and that one cannot fully distinguish truth and error without understanding God’s truth as revealed in the Bible. Everything should then be examined through the lenses of Scripture, as it relates to God and His revelation. Children need not be shielded from the plethora of opposing philosophies and harsh realities of life. Rather, they need to be grounded firmly on the Word of God, which will then arm them with the grid whereby they can sift through different ideas that will come their way.

N.D. Wilson, son of Classical Christian Education proponent Doug Wilson, wrote this excellent piece on how to train children in his book Notes From The Tilt-The-Whirl:

The world is rated R, and no one is checking IDs. Do not try to make it G by imagining the shadows away. Do not try to hide your children from the world forever, but do not pretend there is no danger. Train them. Give them sharp eyes and bellies full of laughter. Make them dangerous. Make them yeast, and when they’ve grown, they will pollute the shadows.

I truly believe that Classical Christian Education will give children the tools to do just that. Children will learn how to acquire information (Grammar), how to think critically (Logic), and how to communicate with clarity (Rhetoric).

Francis Schaeffer once said about education:

If Christianity is not just one more religion, one more upper story kind of thing… then it has something to say about all the disciplines, and it certainly has something to say about the humanities and the arts and the appreciation of them. And I want to say quite firmly, if your Christian school does not do this, I do not believe it is giving a good education… True Christian education is not a negative thing; it is not a matter of isolating the student from the full scope of knowledge. Isolating the student from large sections of human knowledge is not the basis of a Christian education. Rather it is giving him or her the framework or total truth, rooted in the Creator’s existence and in the Bible’s teaching, so that in each step of the formal learning process the student will understand what is true and what is false and why it is true or false. It is not isolating students from human knowledge. It is teaching them in a framework of the total Biblical teaching, beginning with the tremendous central thing, that in the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. It is teaching in this framework, so that on their own level, as they are introduced to all of human knowledge, they are not introduced in the midst of a vacuum, but they are taught each step along the way why what they are hearing is either true or false. That is true education. The student, then, is an educated person.

Classical Christian Education is where knowledge and virtue converge. But ultimately, the goal is for children to recognize and treasure truth, goodness, and beauty, to the glory of God.

 

Resources

Learn more about the Trivium and Christian Christian Education from these valuable resources:

Children’s Catechism Lesson 4: Loving and Doing

Lesson Plan

  • Topic: Loving and Doing
  • Bible Passage: Matthew 5:14-16
  • Big Idea: We glorify God by loving him and doing what he commands.
  • Objectives: Children will understand what glorifying God means. Children will know that we show God that we love Him when we do what he wants us to do. Children will also realize why they should glorify God.
  • Materials Used: Candle, Flashlight, Paper, Scissors, Glue

HOOK

Ask your child to name someone they love. Younger children would usually answer Mom or Dad. 

When we love someone, we would like to do things to make them happy. There are many ways to say “I love you” to someone. Can you name a few things that would make the person you love happy? (obeying parents, listening to teacher’s instructions, giving gifts to friends, etc.)

When you obey your parents, you show them that you love them. When we obey God, we show God that we love Him. Question 4 of the catechism says that we glorify God by loving him and doing what he commands. While Question 5 teaches us to glorify God because he made us and takes care of us.

Q4: How can you glorify God?
A: By loving him and doing what he commands.

 

Q5: Why are you to glorify God?
A: Because he made me and takes care of me.

In the previous lesson, we learned that God made us for his own glory. For this lesson, we are going to learn how and why we are to glorify God.

BOOK

Light a candle or open a flashlight in a dark room. Try to snuff out the candle or cover the flashlight, and observe the reaction. Do it all over again. 

The Bible tells us that God’s children are like light. Listen to what Matthew 5:14-16 says:

“You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” (ESV)

God made us the light of the world, and whenever we show love to God by following what He wants us to do, we glorify Him. But sometimes we don’t love and obey God. We do things that God doesn’t want us to do. We would say mean things to our siblings, open up the candy bar even though Mom and Dad told us not to, and even grab a toy from a friend without asking for permission. When we disobey God, this is what the Bible calls sin. Sin is not following God’s commands. Sin is disobeying God.

Sin keeps us from loving and obeying God. But God found a way to solve the sin problem. He sent His Son Jesus to come into the world to become like us. Jesus was hungry, and thirsty. He cried when a dear friend died. He also got tired. He was like us in every way, but He did not sin. Not only that, Jesus obeyed all of God’s commandments. So when we love and trust in Jesus, God will forgive us all our sins and teach us how to love and obey Him. The Holy Spirit helps us do that by changing our hearts so that instead of loving sin, we will love God. And when other people see that we love and obey God, they may want to know God too. After all, glorifying God is showing others how great and good He is. That’s how we should glorify God.

Our lesson also teaches us that we should glorify God because he made us and takes care of us. We know these things because the Bible shows how God is kind to us.

Carine Mackenzie in her small book called God is Kind lists down several ways God shows us how he takes care of us:

  • He gives us food every day. (Luke 11:3)
  • He give us water to drink. (Isaiah 44:3)
  • He give us sunny days to enjoy. (Jeremiah 31:35)
  • He gives us our family. (Psalm 68:6)
  • He has given us the Bible to help us. (Psalm 68:11)
  • He gives a beautiful life in heaven to those who love him. (Romans 6:23)

LOOK

  • How can you glorify God? By loving him and doing what he commands.
  • Why are you to glorify God? Because he loves me and takes care of me.
  • What does it mean to glorify God?
  • What does it meant to be the light of the world?
  • What are some more ways we can obey God?
  • What are some more ways that God takes care of us?

TOOK

You could choose to sing a song, share a story, or create a craft.

The song called “The Light of the World” sung by Steve Green is based on the Matthew passage.

You are the light of the world, you are the light of the world. Let your light shine before men, you are the light of the world.

Let your light so shine that they may see your good works and glorify your father in heaven.
Let your light shine before men, you are the light of the world

Another great song to teach is The Ten Commandments Song by Judy Roger:

Thou shalt have no other gods but Me;
Before no idol bow thy knee.
Take not the Name of God in vain;
Nor dare the Sabbath Day profane.
Give both thy parents honor due;
Take heed that thou no murder do.
Abstain from words and deeds unclean;
Nor steal, though thou art poor and lean.
And do not lie, but always say what is true,
And covet not the things that don’t belong to you!

You could also close with a story written by R.C. Sproul called The Lightlings in keeping with the light theme.

R.C. Sproul weaves an allegorical tale that captures the essence of the biblical story of redemption in a manner that will fascinate and delight children. A race of tiny beings known as lightlings are a picture of humanity as they pass through all the stages of the biblical drama – creation, fall, and redemption. In the end, children will understand why some people fear light more than darkness, but why they need never fear darkness again.

You can hear the whole story as read by R.C. Sproul himself over at Renewing Your Mind. You can also purchase the book over at the Westminster Bookstore. It is also available locally through the Katecheo webstore.

If your child is into crafts, you could also create a lantern using basic supplies you may already have at home. Please see full instructions over here.

Related Resources

Children’s Catechism Lesson 3: For His Glory

Lesson Plan

  • Topic: For His Glory
  • Bible Passage: 1 Corinthians 10:31; Psalm 19:1
  • Big Idea: God made the world and us for his own glory.
  • Objectives: Children shall recognize that God created all things for his glory. Children will know that talking about God’s glory means talking about how great and good God is. Children will understand that glorifying God is like reflecting, pointing to, or shining for Him.
  • Materials Used: Mirror, Binoculars, Night Light or Flashlight, Pictures of Nature/Sceneries

HOOK

Lay down all the materials on a table or place them inside a basket. Ask the child to name each item as you show them one by one. You may ask an older child what each item can do or what each item is for.

A mirror can show us what we look like. A pair of binoculars can give us a better view of someone at a distance. A night light or flashlight can light up a dark room.

Our third catechism lesson teaches us the reason why God made the us and all the world around us. Laying on the foundational truths about their existence as created beings is extremely important to children during their tender years. The catechism asks and answers:

Q3: Why did God make you and all things?

A: For his own glory.

Introduce the third catechism, and excitedly inform the child you’ll find out what these three things have to do with the lesson.

BOOK

The Bible teaches us that God created the world and us for his own glory. When we talk about God’s glory, we are talking about how great and good God is.

Show a picture of a beautiful nature scene, like a forest or mountain. God made the whole world—the blue sky, the bright sun, the raging rivers, and the little birds that sing. Listen to what Psalm 19:1 says:

The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork.

The sky and the mountains glorify God. They show people how great and good God is. They remind us that God created all things. Not only that, God made us for his own glory, too.

We are to be like mirrors that reflect how good and great God is. We are to be like a pair of binoculars that gives a clearer view of what God is like. We are also like flashlights that shines the light of Jesus in this dark and sinful world. We are made to glorify God. The Bible teaches us in 1 Corinthians 10:31:

So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.

In everything we do, we are to show others how great and good God is. This is why God made us.

LOOK

  • Why did God make you and all things? For his own glory.
  • What does it mean to glorify God? To show others how great and good God is.

Sometimes, we are not very good reflections, pointers, and sources of light. We have sinful hearts, and they keep us from glorifying God. But God solved the problem of sinful hearts by sending His Son Jesus to come to earth, and live like us. Jesus became a man, and always glorified God. Jesus lived a perfect life and died on the cross to take the punishment that we deserve for our sins. If we follow and trust in him, God will forgive us our sins and teach us how to glorify Him. In fact, Jesus Himself said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12, ESV)

TOOK

Create a pair of binoculars using tissue paper rolls to bring home the lesson about glorifying God.

Tape together two toilet paper rolls side by side. Cut a strip of paper approximately 3×11 inches wide. Let your child decorate the paper as desired with tape, markers and the like. Wrap the decorated paper around the pair of toilet paper rolls and secure on the underside with more tape. Hole punch the outside of both rolls and add a strap using cording, rope or string

TP craft photo and instructions is taken from Raising Arizona Kids.

Another thing you could do is to share about the life and ministry of Augustine, the church father. As a young boy, he was full of mischief—he stole pears from his neighbor just because he enjoyed doing wrong. But his mother prayed for him regularly until one day, God saved him and he became a bishop.

Augustine wrote books that God used to help many people understand the Bible. In one of those books, he wrote: “You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they find their rest in you.” That means, the purpose why God made each of us is to glorify Him. If we’re not doing showing others how great and good God is through our words, thoughts and actions, we are not doing what we were originally created to do.

Related Resources

Children’s Catechism Lesson 2: God Made All Things

Lesson 2

Lesson Plan

  • Topic: God Made All Things
  • Bible Passage: Genesis 1
  • Big Idea: God created everything.
  • Objectives: Children shall recognize that God created all things. Children shall realize that no one but God could create the world. Children shall acknowledge that God is powerful and wise for He created all the things we see around us.
  • Materials Used: Clay, Animal Figures/Toys

HOOK

When you’re teaching a toddler, open up the lesson by asking what sound each animal makes. You can say, “What does the cow say?” (Moo) “What does the sheep say?” (Baa)

Preschool children who already have phonological awareness or can recognize their letters can be asked to name different animals based on each letter. You can ask, “Can you name an animal that begins with the letter A?” (Alligator) “How about an animal that begins with the letter B?” (Bear)

You may transition to the next part by asking, “Did you know that God created all these animals? Not just that, God is all powerful because created everything that we see all around us!”

BOOK

The Bible tells us that God created us. This lesson talks about how God made our beautiful world, and everything in it. He created the stars in the night sky, the trees in the field, and all the animals, too. You may reinforce the first catechism lesson of how God created the world ex nihilo.

Read through Genesis 1 or the story of creation using an age-appropriate story Bible. My particular favorite for toddlers, Baby’s Hug-A-Bible, is written by Sally Lloyd-Jones. It’s written as a lullaby for babies and small children, and it goes something like,

Little one, who made the seas?
Who made the birds? Who made the bees?
Who made the sun, all big and bright?
And twinkly stars to shine at night?

 

God made them all. Oh yes, it’s true.
Yes, little one, and God made you.

What’s great with this story Bible is that Rain for Roots wrote a song using those very same words. Actually, a whole album was recorded to complement the story Bible. I’ve included the YouTube video below:

God is powerful for He created all these wonderful things. God is also wise because he created different environments where humans and animals can survive and thrive. He created time, weather, and food. He made the birds in the air, the fishes in the sea, the creatures who could crawl and walk in the land.

I used a small book called God Has Power by Carine MacKenzie to teach the theological lesson. We got this from Westminster Bookstore many years ago.

A post shared by Keren (@kerendotph) on

Some would people like to refer to the world as “Mother Nature.” This idea stems from Greek Mythology, and should be avoided as it is contrary to what the Bible teaches. There is no Mother Nature. There is only God who created all things. No one but God could create the world.

One familiar tune that you could also use to explain the lesson is the Sunday School classic, My God is So Big:

My God is so big,
So strong, and so mighty—
There’s nothing my God cannot do.

The mountains are His;
The valleys are His;
The stars are His handiwork, too.

My God is so big,
So strong, and so mighty—
There’s nothing my God cannot do.

LOOK

Repeat the catechism question and answer:

  • What else did God make? God made all things.
  • Can anyone else create the world? No one but God alone.
  • What did God use to create the world? The word of His power. He spoke, and all things came to be.

Smaller toddlers who cannot yet speak in sentences can simply answer “things” or “all things” when prompted with the catechism question. I do the same with my two year old who struggles to string words together.

TOOK

I decided to let the Little Man play with clay and animal figures in order teach him about the sky, sea and land. I had to rethink the activity because it was not age-appropriate for him.

One thing you could try to do at home is to bake cookies together using your favorite recipe. Younger children need a lot of assistance, but it is a worthwhile activity that most kids enjoy. Explain that we all need ingredients to make something. In order to make cookies, you need flour, salt, sugar, butter, chocolate chips, etc. But God did not use anything to create the world, He only spoke and all things came to be. God is powerful for he made all things out of nothing.

You could do a variety of activities/crafts depending on the age of your child. Here are some ideas that you could try:

  • Sequence the seven days of creation.
  • Create paper flowers.
  • Make homemade clay.
  • Paint a picture of God’s world.
  • Name animals, plants or food after each letter of the alphabet.
  • Mold animals or sceneries using clay.
  • Match animals according to their biomes.

More ideas can be found at Danielle’s Place over here.

Related Resources