Children’s Catechism Lesson 2: God Made All Things

Lesson 2

Lesson Plan

  • Topic: God Made All Things
  • Bible Passage: Genesis 1
  • Big Idea: God created everything.
  • Objectives: Children shall recognize that God created all things. Children shall realize that no one but God could create the world. Children shall acknowledge that God is powerful and wise for He created all the things we see around us.
  • Materials Used: Clay, Animal Figures/Toys

HOOK

When you’re teaching a toddler, open up the lesson by asking what sound each animal makes. You can say, “What does the cow say?” (Moo) “What does the sheep say?” (Baa)

Preschool children who already have phonological awareness or can recognize their letters can be asked to name different animals based on each letter. You can ask, “Can you name an animal that begins with the letter A?” (Alligator) “How about an animal that begins with the letter B?” (Bear)

You may transition to the next part by asking, “Did you know that God created all these animals? Not just that, God is all powerful because created everything that we see all around us!”

BOOK

The Bible tells us that God created us. This lesson talks about how God made our beautiful world, and everything in it. He created the stars in the night sky, the trees in the field, and all the animals, too. You may reinforce the first catechism lesson of how God created the world ex nihilo.

Read through Genesis 1 or the story of creation using an age-appropriate story Bible. My particular favorite for toddlers, Baby’s Hug-A-Bible, is written by Sally Lloyd-Jones. It’s written as a lullaby for babies and small children, and it goes something like,

Little one, who made the seas?
Who made the birds? Who made the bees?
Who made the sun, all big and bright?
And twinkly stars to shine at night?

 

God made them all. Oh yes, it’s true.
Yes, little one, and God made you.

What’s great with this story Bible is that Rain for Roots wrote a song using those very same words. Actually, a whole album was recorded to complement the story Bible. I’ve included the YouTube video below:

God is powerful for He created all these wonderful things. God is also wise because he created different environments where humans and animals can survive and thrive. He created time, weather, and food. He made the birds in the air, the fishes in the sea, the creatures who could crawl and walk in the land.

I used a small book called God Has Power by Carine MacKenzie to teach the theological lesson. We got this from Westminster Bookstore many years ago.

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Some would people like to refer to the world as “Mother Nature.” This idea stems from Greek Mythology, and should be avoided as it is contrary to what the Bible teaches. There is no Mother Nature. There is only God who created all things. No one but God could create the world.

One familiar tune that you could also use to explain the lesson is the Sunday School classic, My God is So Big:

My God is so big,
So strong, and so mighty—
There’s nothing my God cannot do.

The mountains are His;
The valleys are His;
The stars are His handiwork, too.

My God is so big,
So strong, and so mighty—
There’s nothing my God cannot do.

LOOK

Repeat the catechism question and answer:

  • What else did God make? God made all things.
  • Can anyone else create the world? No one but God alone.
  • What did God use to create the world? The word of His power. He spoke, and all things came to be.

Smaller toddlers who cannot yet speak in sentences can simply answer “things” or “all things” when prompted with the catechism question. I do the same with my two year old who struggles to string words together.

TOOK

I decided to let the Little Man play with clay and animal figures in order teach him about the sky, sea and land. I had to rethink the activity because it was not age-appropriate for him.

One thing you could try to do at home is to bake cookies together using your favorite recipe. Younger children need a lot of assistance, but it is a worthwhile activity that most kids enjoy. Explain that we all need ingredients to make something. In order to make cookies, you need flour, salt, sugar, butter, chocolate chips, etc. But God did not use anything to create the world, He only spoke and all things came to be. God is powerful for he made all things out of nothing.

You could do a variety of activities/crafts depending on the age of your child. Here are some ideas that you could try:

  • Sequence the seven days of creation.
  • Create paper flowers.
  • Make homemade clay.
  • Paint a picture of God’s world.
  • Name animals, plants or food after each letter of the alphabet.
  • Mold animals or sceneries using clay.
  • Match animals according to their biomes.

More ideas can be found at Danielle’s Place over here.

Related Resources

Children’s Catechism Lesson 1: Who Made You?

Ever since I have been introduced to the Reformed faith, I’ve been wanting to write a catechism curriculum for children based on the First Catechism, an intro to the Westminster Shorter Catechism. That was almost a decade ago, and even though I was involved in children’s ministry I was not prepared to write a catechism curriculum. But having children of my own provided me with practical tools that could help me understand what it means to explain the beautiful truths of the Christian faith in a way that young children can understand. And getting to know more children with special learning needs has allowed me to discover various ways to explain these truths in a creative manner.

You can find a complete list of catechism question and answers at the Westminster Standard or through the OPC website.

Lesson 1

The first question and answer may seem too simple, even a small toddler can echo back the answer. But in the 21st century when evolution is a common thing, knowing the answer to the first question is essential to any young believer.

Q1: Who made you?
A: God.

Little Miss (now 5) only began echoing answers to this catechism question at age 3, and the Little Man (now 2) only parroted the answer when I taught him to answer “God” in a song-song manner. He started out answering “Amen” to the question when I reintroduced the catechism. Perhaps he associates God with prayer, which may actually be a good thing.

Lesson Plan

  • Topic: Who Made You?
  • Bible Passages: Genesis 1:26-30; Psalm 139:13-14
  • Big Idea: God created man out of nothing after His image.
  • Objectives: Children shall recognize that God was the One who created them. Children shall realize that God made them out of nothing and after His image. Children shall take comfort in knowing that they are wonderfully made by God.
  • Materials Used: Clay, Googly Eyes, Foam Stickers, Pipe Cleaners

Hook

Introduce the lesson by asking what the child’s name is, most toddlers are able to do that. An older child can write his name on a piece of paper. And then ask if he knows the story (i.e. meaning, history or reason for choosing) behind his name.
If your child is not yet ready for any of that, this is a great opportunity for you to practice saying or writing his name with him. Once or twice would be enough to start the lesson.

Transition to the next part by asking, “Do you know who made (Insert Child’s Name)? Let’s find out!”

Book

Read a story of how created Adam and Eve from a Gospel-centered story Bible or from the Bible directly. You could also use the first few pages of God Made All of Me by Justine and Lindsey Holcomb, which also addresses Q/A 1 and 2 of the catechism.

If older kids have questions regarding how God created us, you could look into Chapter 3 (“God Created Everything out of Nothing at All”) from The Oology by Marty Machowski (HT: Reformed Mama). You may also introduce the Latin phrase ex nihilo which means “out of nothing”. God did not use any raw materials to create man. Instead, He said it and it came be.

Look

After the Bible story, repeatedly practice the catechism question and answer.

  • Who made you? God.
  • Did God use anything to create man? No. God created man out of nothing.
  • How did God create man? God created man after His own image.

Took

Bring home the lesson by introducing another Bible passage in Psalm 139:13-14, “For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well.” (ESV)

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Teach your child that all men are wonderfully created by God. Each of us are unique in the way our brains are wired, even how each of us are gifted differently. As God’s creatures, He has also given us emotions that could express how we feel. We can be happy by praising God who wonderfully made us. We can be sad when some people try to hurt others who are likewise created by God. We can be angry when some people try to destroy God’s original design for the male and female. You may use clay and other craft materials (optional) to teach your child about his body parts or different emotions. Teaching the importance of identifying or verbalizing emotions is an essential life goal for children with special needs. Non-verbal or less verbal children can learn by identifying pictures to convey their feelings.

Another alternative is to simply ask him to draw and color himself, if able. Make sure to add the phrase “God Made (Insert Child’s Name)” when done. You could then wrap up the lesson by singing “God Made Me” by the Cedarmont Kids:

God made me, God made me
In my Bible book it says
That God made me

Other Related Resources